I want to make this syntax possible:   var a = add(2)(3); //5   based on what I read at http://dmitry.baranovskiy.com/post/31797647  I've got no clue how to make it possible....
I wrote a simple curry function in JavaScript which works correctly for most cases:    const add = curry((a, b, c) => a + b + c);  const add2 = add(2);  const add5 = add2(3);  console.log(add5(5)); <script> const curried = Symbol("curr...
I am trying move more towards functional programming in my javascript applications. I currently use the library ramda as a base lib for this.   My desire:   Create a function findWithId(id, list) which returns the item in the list with the property _...
Below is a specific use case of using a normal and a curried function. Are there any advantages for using either if you only using two arguments?  //Normal Function function add(x, y) {     return x + y; }  //Curried Function function add1(x) {     r...
Recently I read about function composition in a Javascript book, and then on a website I saw someone reference it as currying.  Are they the same concept?...
I don’t think I’ve grokked currying yet. I understand what it does, and how to do it. I just can’t think of a situation I would use it.  Where are you using currying in JavaScript (or where are the main libraries using it)? DOM manipulation or...
I currently have a partial-application function which looks like this:  Function.prototype.curry = function() {     var args = [];     for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; ++i)         args.push(arguments[i]);      return function()     {...
I am trying to write a (curried?) onChange event handler on a Component that will receive a key argument which will let it know which key in the state object to update. The code won't compile, saying 'key' is not defined.  class App exten...
If f :: a -> b -> c is curried then uncurry(f) can be defined as:  uncurry :: (a -> b -> c) -> ((a, b) -> c)  I'm trying to implement the above function in javascript. Is my below implementation correct and generic enough or are...
I love currying but there are a couple of reasons why a lof of Javascript devs reject this technique:   aesthetic concerns about the typical curry pattern: f(x) (y) (z) concerns about performance penalties due to the increased number of function call...

Tags

Recent Questions

Top Questions

Home Tags Terms of Service Privacy Policy DMCA Contact Us

©2020 All rights reserved.