In ES6, both of these are legal:  var chopper = {     owner: 'Zed',     getOwner: function() { return this.owner; } };   and, as shorthand:  var chopper = {     owner: 'Zed',     getOwner() { return this.owner; } }   Is it possible...
How one can write a function, which takes only few attributes in most-compact way in ES6?  I've came up with solution using destructuring + simplified object literal, but I don't like that list of fields is repeated in the code.  Is there a...
The question is directed at people who have thought about code style in the context of the upcoming ECMAScript 6 (Harmony) and who have already worked with the language.  With () => {} and function () {} we are getting two very similar ways to w...
I would like to ask why my state is not changing when I do an onclick event. I've search a while ago that I need to bind the onclick function in constructor but still the state is not updating. Here's my code:  import React from 'react&...
I have been playing with ES6 for a while and I noticed that while variables declared with var are hoisted as expected...  console.log(typeof name); // undefined var name = "John";   ...variables declared with let or const seem to have some...
When returning an object from an arrow function, it seems that it is necessary to use an extra set of {} and a return keyword because of an ambiguity in the grammar.  That means I can’t write p => {foo: "bar"}, but have to write p =>...
I haven't seen this syntax before and am wondering what it's all about.   var { Navigation } = require('react-router');   The brackets on the left are throwing a syntax error:     unexpected token {   I'm not sure what part of t...
The new es6 arrow functions say return is implicit under some circumstances:     The expression is also the implicit return value of that function.   In what cases do I need to use return with es6 arrow functions?...
I'm trying to organize my state by using nested property like this:  this.state = {    someProperty: {       flag:true    } }   But updating state like this,  this.setState({ someProperty.flag: false });   doesn't work. How can this be done...
I've heard that accessing let and const values before they are initialized can cause a ReferenceError because of something called the temporal dead zone.  What is the temporal dead zone, how does it relate to scope and hoisting, and in what sit...

Tags

Recent Questions

Top Questions

Home Tags Terms of Service Privacy Policy DMCA Contact Us

©2020 All rights reserved.