I am using ASP.Net to serialize classes designed in C# to JSON. My Javascript application then requests those objects with AJAX. I have done this on a couple of projects now, but I run into the problem that the C# standard naming conventions use Pasc...
Context  I read a JavaScript code example written by Google. It used:   Single lowercase letters for naming variables Single uppercase letters for naming functions   So the code was illegible.  Questions   Why this naming? What tools are using to do...
I'm adopting a large mish-mash of Javascript / jQuery code. I'd like to move it to Backbone.js but as an intermediary, I'm trying to namespace it so that it is sligthtly more modular.  I am wondering if there is a standard for namespaces...
Should files be named something-with-hyphens.js, camelCased.js, or something else?  I didn't find the answer to this question here....
Is there a recommended naming convention for key names within a const object in es6? I haven't been able to find a resource which states if they should be uppercase or lowercase.  const COLOR_CODES = {   BLUE: 1,   RED: 1 };   vs  const COLOR_COD...
This question already has answers here:...
We are following the Laravel standard of naming model attributes as snake_case_variables. Although Laravel is just the API layer in our system that talks to a Javascript frontend and many other applications.  All the consumers of our API have a stron...
Is there a name convention if it comes to curried function like this:  const someName = argA => argB => ... const newFunction = someName(someArg)   is there any convention for naming the declaration of someName? like prefixing it with init / cr...
I'd like to avoid having to remember two names for a method, one for public and one for private access. In that sense, in which case would a script fail if you use same name for both? When would following code fail?  var TestClass = function() {...
Say I need to stick some methods onto an object using the this keyword, but inside of another function, or inside of a promise (for some reason this is undefined in that context).  Is there a convention for doing this? This is a semantic question as...

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