I wrote a simple curry function in JavaScript which works correctly for most cases:    const add = curry((a, b, c) => a + b + c);  const add2 = add(2);  const add5 = add2(3);  console.log(add5(5)); <script> const curried = Symbol("curr...
If I want to partially apply a function I can use bind, but it seems I have to affect the receiver of the function (the first argument to bind). Is this correct?  I want to perform partial application using bind without affecting the receiver.     my...
In Douglas Crockford's book "Javascript: The Good Parts" he provides code for a curry method which takes a function and arguments and returns that function with the arguments already added (apparently, this is not really what "curry&#...
The following code is taken from Jon Resig's book Secrets of JavaScript Ninja to explain how to use closures to implement partial application of functions. However I have issues understanding the intent of the variable arg. Why is it required and...
I quite often see on the Internet various complaints that other peoples examples of currying are not currying, but are actually just partial application.  I've not found a decent explanation of what partial application is, or how it differs from...
I am reading through John Resig's Secrets of Javascript ninja and was trying out one of the examples on currying and parital functions.   The code is as follows:  <html> <body> <button id="test">Click Me!</button>...
I'm trying to write a function utilizing callback that will mimic this behavior:  var fullName = function (firstName, lastName) {   return firstName + ' ' + lastName; };  var michaelName = partial(fullName, 'Michael'); michaelName...
I was wondering if there is any way to pull that in Java. I think it is not possible without native support for closures....

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