Simple way to get element by id within a div tag?

Please forgive me if I repeat the question.

I have HTML?that all elements inside a div tag has different id, suppose I have already get the reference to the div, is there any simple way to get the element by its id without iterate all elements with that div?

here is my sample html:

<div id="div1" >
    <input type="text" id="edit1" />
    <input type="text" id="edit2" />
</div>
<div id="div2" >
    <input type="text" id="edit1" />
    <input type="text" id="edit2" />
</div>

Answers:

Answer

You may try something like this.

Sample Markup.

<div id="div1" >
    <input type="text" id="edit1" />
    <input type="text" id="edit2" />
</div>
<div id="div2" >
    <input type="text" id="edit3" />
    <input type="text" id="edit4" />
</div>

JavaScript

function GetElementInsideContainer(containerID, childID) {
    var elm = {};
    var elms = document.getElementById(containerID).getElementsByTagName("*");
    for (var i = 0; i < elms.length; i++) {
        if (elms[i].id === childID) {
            elm = elms[i];
            break;
        }
    }
    return elm;
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/naveen/H8j2A/

A better method as suggested by nnnnnn

function GetElementInsideContainer(containerID, childID) {
    var elm = document.getElementById(childID);
    var parent = elm ? elm.parentNode : {};
    return (parent.id && parent.id === containerID) ? elm : {};
}

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/naveen/4JMgF/

Call it like

var e = GetElementInsideContainer("div1", "edit1");
Answer
var x = document.getElementById("parent").querySelector("#child");
// don't forget a #

or

var x = document.querySelector("#parent").querySelector("#child");

or

var x = document.querySelector("#parent #child");

or

var x = document.querySelector("#parent");
var y = x.querySelector("#child");

eg.

var x = document.querySelector("#div1").querySelector("#edit2");
Answer

You don't want to do this. It is invalid HTML to have more than one element with the same id. Browsers won't treat that well, and you will have undefined behavior, meaning you have no idea what the browser will give you when you select an element by that id, it could be unpredictable.

You should be using a class, or just iterating through the inputs and keeping track of an index.

Try something like this:

var div2 = document.getElementById('div2');
for(i = j = 0; i < div2.childNodes.length; i++)
    if(div2.childNodes[i].nodeName == 'INPUT'){
        j++;
        var input = div2.childNodes[i];
        alert('This is edit'+j+': '+input);
    }

JSFiddle

Answer

A given ID can be only used once in a page. It's invalid HTML to have multiple objects with the same ID, even if they are in different parts of the page.

You could change your HTML to this:

<div id="div1" >
    <input type="text" class="edit1" />
    <input type="text" class="edit2" />
</div>
<div id="div2" >
    <input type="text" class="edit1" />
    <input type="text" class="edit2" />
</div>

Then, you could get the first item in div1 with a CSS selector like this:

#div1 .edit1

On in jQuery:

$("#div1 .edit1")

Or, if you want to iterate the items in one of your divs, you can do it like this:

$("#div1 input").each(function(index) {
    // do something with one of the input objects
});

If I couldn't use a framework like jQuery or YUI, I'd go get Sizzle and include that for it's selector logic (it's the same selector engine as is inside of jQuery) because DOM manipulation is massively easier with a good selector library.

If I couldn't use even Sizzle (which would be a massive drop in developer productivity), you could use plain DOM functions to traverse the children of a given element.

You would use DOM functions like childNodes or firstChild and nextSibling and you'd have to check the nodeType to make sure you only got the kind of elements you wanted. I never write code that way because it's so much less productive than using a selector library.

Answer

In HTML ids should be unique. I suggest you change your code to something like this:

<div id="div1" >
    <input type="text" name="edit1" id="edit1" />
    <input type="text" name="edit2" id="edit2" />
</div>
<div id="div2" >
    <input type="text" name="edit1" id="edit3" />
    <input type="text" name="edit2" id="edit4" />
</div>
Answer
Sample Html code   
 <div id="temp">
        F1 <input type="text" value="111"/><br/>
        F2 <input type="text" value="222"/><br/>
        F3 <input type="text" value="333"/><br/>
        Type <select>
        <option value="A">A</option>
        <option value="B">B</option>
        <option value="C">C</option>
        </select>
        <input type="button" value="Go" onclick="getVal()">
    </div>

Javascript

    function  getVal()
    {
        var test = document.getElementById("temp").getElementsByTagName("input");
        alert("Number of Input Elements "+test.length);
        for(var i=0;i<test.length;i++)
        {
          if(test[i].type=="text")
          {
            alert(test[i].value);
          }
       }
      test = document.getElementById("temp").getElementsByTagName("select");
      alert("Select box  "+test[0].options[test[0].selectedIndex].text);
    }

By providing different tag names we can get all the values from the div.
Answer

Unfortunately this is invalid HTML. An ID has to be unique in the whole HTML file.

When you use Javascript's document.getElementById() it depends on the browser, which element it will return, mostly it's the first with a given ID.

You will have no other chance as to re-assign your IDs, or alternatively using the class attribute.

Answer

A simple way to do what OP desires in core JS.

document.getElementById(parent.id).children[child.id];

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