stopPropagation vs. stopImmediatePropagation

What's the difference between event.stopPropagation() and event.stopImmediatePropagation()?

Answers:

Answer

A small example to demonstrate how both these propagation stoppages work.

var state = {
  stopPropagation: false,
  stopImmediatePropagation: false
};

function handlePropagation(event) {
  if (state.stopPropagation) {
    event.stopPropagation();
  }

  if (state.stopImmediatePropagation) {
    event.stopImmediatePropagation();
  }
}

$("#child").click(function(e) {
  handlePropagation(e);
  console.log("First event handler on #child");
});


$("#child").click(function(e) {
  handlePropagation(e);
  console.log("Second event handler on #child");
});

// First this event will fire on the child element, then propogate up and
// fire for the parent element.
$("div").click(function(e) {
  handlePropagation(e);
  console.log("Event handler on div: #" + this.id);
});


// Enable/disable propogation
$("button").click(function() {
  var objectId = this.id;
  $(this).toggleClass('active');
  state[objectId] = $(this).hasClass('active');
  console.log('---------------------');
});
div {
  padding: 1em;
}

#parent {
  background-color: #CCC;
}

#child {
  background-color: #000;
  padding: 5em;
}

button {
  padding: 1em;
  font-size: 1em;
}

.active {
  background-color: green;
  color: white;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="parent">
  <div id="child">&nbsp;</div>
</div>

<button id="stopPropagation">Stop Propogation</button>
<button id="stopImmediatePropagation" ">Stop Immediate Propogation</button>

There are three event handlers bound. If we don’t stop any propagation, then there should be four alerts - three on the child div, and one on the parent div.

If we stop the event from propagating, then there will be 3 alerts (all on the inner child div). Since the event won’t propagate up the DOM hierarchy, the parent div won’t see it, and its handler won’t fire.

If we stop propagation immediately, then there will only be 1 alert. Even though there are three event handlers attached to the inner child div, only 1 is executed and any further propagation is killed immediately, even within the same element.

Answer

event.stopPropagation will prevent handlers on parent elements from running.
Calling event.stopImmediatePropagation will also prevent other handlers on the same element from running.

Answer

I am a late comer, but maybe I can say this with a specific example:

Say, if you have a <table>, with <tr>, and then <td>. Now, let's say you set 3 event handlers for the <td> element, then if you do event.stopPropagation() in the first event handler you set for <td>, then all event handlers for <td> will still run, but the event just won't propagate to <tr> or <table> (and won't go up and up to <body>, <html>, document, and window).

Now, however, if you use event.stopImmediatePropagation() in your first event handler, then, the other two event handlers for <td> WILL NOT run, and won't propagate up to <tr>, <table> (and won't go up and up to <body>, <html>, document, and window).

Note that it is not just for <td>. For other elements, it will follow the same principle.

Answer

1)event.stopPropagation(): =>It is used to stop executions of its corresponding parent handler only.

2) event.stopImmediatePropagation(): => It is used to stop the execution of its corresponding parent handler and also handler or function attached to itself except the current handler. => It also stops all the handler attached to the current element of entire DOM.

Here is the example: Jsfiddle!

Thanks, -Sahil

Answer

event.stopPropagation() allows other handlers on the same element to be executed, while event.stopImmediatePropagation() prevents every event from running. For example, see below jQuery code block.

$("p").click(function(event)
{ event.stopImmediatePropagation();
});
$("p").click(function(event)
{ // This function won't be executed 
$(this).css("color", "#fff7e3");
});

If event.stopPropagation was used in previous example, then the next click event on p element which changes the css will fire, but in case event.stopImmediatePropagation(), the next p click event will not fire.

Answer

Here I am adding my JSfiddle example for stopPropagation vs stopImmediatePropagation. JSFIDDLE

let stopProp = document.getElementById('stopPropagation');
let stopImmediate = document.getElementById('stopImmediatebtn');
let defaultbtn = document.getElementById("defalut-btn");


stopProp.addEventListener("click", function(event){
	event.stopPropagation();
  console.log('stopPropagation..')
  
})
stopProp.addEventListener("click", function(event){
  console.log('AnotherClick')
  
})
stopImmediate.addEventListener("click", function(event){
		event.stopImmediatePropagation();
    console.log('stopimmediate')
})

stopImmediate.addEventListener("click", function(event){
    console.log('ImmediateStop Another event wont work')
})

defaultbtn.addEventListener("click", function(event){
    alert("Default Clik");
})
defaultbtn.addEventListener("click", function(event){
    console.log("Second event defined will also work same time...")
})
div{
  margin: 10px;
}
<p>
The simple example for event.stopPropagation and stopImmediatePropagation?
Please open console to view the results and click both button.
</p>
<div >
<button id="stopPropagation">
stopPropagation-Button
</button>
</div>
<div  id="grand-div">
  <div class="new" id="parent-div">
    <button id="stopImmediatebtn">
    StopImmediate
    </button>
  </div>
</div>
<div>
<button id="defalut-btn">
Normat Button
</button>
</div>

Answer

stopPropagation will prevent any parent handlers from being executed stopImmediatePropagation will prevent any parent handlers and also any other handlers from executing

Quick example from the jquery documentation:

$("p").click(function(event) {
  event.stopImmediatePropagation();
});

$("p").click(function(event) {
  // This function won't be executed
  $(this).css("background-color", "#f00");
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<p>example</p>

Note that the order of the event binding is important here!

$("p").click(function(event) {
  // This function will now trigger
  $(this).css("background-color", "#f00");
});

$("p").click(function(event) {
  event.stopImmediatePropagation();
});
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

<p>example</p>

Answer

From the jQuery API:

In addition to keeping any additional handlers on an element from being executed, this method also stops the bubbling by implicitly calling event.stopPropagation(). To simply prevent the event from bubbling to ancestor elements but allow other event handlers to execute on the same element, we can use event.stopPropagation() instead.

Use event.isImmediatePropagationStopped() to know whether this method was ever called (on that event object).

In short: event.stopPropagation() allows other handlers on the same element to be executed, while event.stopImmediatePropagation() prevents every event from running.

Answer

Surprisingly, all other answers only say half the truth or are actually wrong!

  • e.stopImmediatePropagation() stops any further handler from being called for this event, no exceptions
  • e.stopPropagation() is similar, but does still call all handlers for this phase on this element if not called already

What phase?

E.g. a click event will always first go all the way down the DOM (called “capture phase”), finally reach the origin of the event (“target phase”) and then bubble up again (“bubble phase”). And with addEventListener() you can register multiple handlers for both capture and bubble phase independently. (Target phase calls handlers of both types on the target without distinguishing.)

And this is what the other answers are incorrect about:

  • quote: “event.stopPropagation() allows other handlers on the same element to be executed”
  • correction: if stopped in the capture phase, bubble phase handlers will never be reached, also skipping them on the same element
  • quote: “event.stopPropagation() [...] is used to stop executions of its corresponding parent handler only”
  • correction: if stopped in the capture phase, handlers on any children, including the target aren’t called either, not only parents

A fiddle and mozilla.org event phase explanation with demo.

Tags

Recent Questions

Top Questions

Home Tags Terms of Service Privacy Policy DMCA Contact Us

©2020 All rights reserved.