Test for multiple cases in a switch, like an OR (||)

How would you use a switch case when you need to test for a or b in the same case?

switch (pageid) {
  case "listing-page" || "home-page":
    alert("hello");
    break;
  case "details-page":
    alert("goodbye");
    break;
}

Answers:

Answer

You can use fall-through:

switch (pageid)
{
    case "listing-page":
    case "home-page":
        alert("hello");
        break;
    case "details-page":
        alert("goodbye");
        break;
}
Answer

Since the other answers explained how to do it without actually explaining why it works:

When the switch executes, it finds the first matching case statement and then executes each line of code after the switch until it hits either a break statement or the end of the switch (or a return statement to leave the entire containing function). When you deliberately omit the break so that code under the next case gets executed too that's called a fall-through. So for the OP's requirement:

switch (pageid) {
   case "listing-page":
   case "home-page":
      alert("hello");
      break;

   case "details-page":
      alert("goodbye");
      break;
} 

Forgetting to include break statements is a fairly common coding mistake and is the first thing you should look for if your switch isn't working the way you expected. For that reason some people like to put a comment in to say "fall through" to make it clear when break statements have been omitted on purpose. I do that in the following example since it is a bit more complicated and shows how some cases can include code to execute before they fall-through:

switch (someVar) {
   case 1:
      someFunction();
      alert("It was 1");
      // fall through
   case 2:
      alert("The 2 case");
      // fall through
   case 3:
      // fall through
   case 4:
      // fall through
   case 5:
      alert("The 5 case");
      // fall through
   case 6:
      alert("The 6 case");
      break;

   case 7:
      alert("Something else");
      break;

   case 8:
      // fall through
   default:
      alert("The end");
      break;
}

You can also (optionally) include a default case, which will be executed if none of the other cases match - if you don't include a default and no cases match then nothing happens. You can (optionally) fall through to the default case.

So in my second example if someVar is 1 it would call someFunction() and then you would see four alerts as it falls through multiple cases some of which have alerts under them. Is someVar is 3, 4 or 5 you'd see two alerts. If someVar is 7 you'd see "Something else" and if it is 8 or any other value you'd see "The end".

Answer

You need to make two case labels.

Control will fall through from the first label to the second, so they'll both execute the same code.

Answer

You have to switch it!

switch (true) {
    case ( (pageid === "listing-page") || (pageid === ("home-page") ):
        alert("hello");
        break;
    case (pageid === "details-page"):
        alert("goodbye");
        break;
}
Answer

Forget switch and break, lets play with if. And instead of asserting

if(pageid === "listing-page" || pageid === "home-page")

lets create several arrays with cases and check it with Array.prototype.includes()

var caseA = ["listing-page", "home-page"];
var caseB = ["details-page", "case04", "case05"];

if(caseA.includes(pageid)) {
    alert("hello");
}
else if (caseB.includes(pageid)) {
    alert("goodbye");
}
else {
    alert("there is no else case");
}
Answer

Use commas to separate case

switch (pageid)
{
    case "listing-page","home-page":
        alert("hello");
        break;
    case "details-page":
        alert("goodbye");
        break;
}

Tags

Recent Questions

Top Questions

Home Tags Terms of Service Privacy Policy DMCA Contact Us

©2020 All rights reserved.