Alternative version for Object.values()

I'm looking for an alternative version for the Object.values() function.
As described here the function is not supported in Internet Explorer.

When executing the following example code:

var obj = { foo: 'bar', baz: 42 };
console.log(Object.values(obj)); // ['bar', 42]

It works in both, Firefox and Chrome, but throws the following error in IE11:

Object doesn't support property or method "values"

Here you can test it: Fiddle.

So, what would be a quick fix?

Answers:

Answer

Object.values() is part of the ES8(June 2017) specification. Using Cordova, I realized Android 5.0 Webview doesn't support it. So, I did the following, creating the polyfill function only if the feature is not supported:

if (!Object.values) Object.values = o=>Object.keys(o).map(k=>o[k]);
Answer

Since Object is a (not so) recent implementation, if you want to support all browsers (AKA IE8 and below), then you need to create your own function:

function objectValues(obj) {
    var res = [];
    for (var i in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
            res.push(obj[i]);
        }
    }
    return res;
}

PS: Just noticed the ecmascript-6 tag. Btw I keep this answer here, just in case someone needs it.

Answer

If you are already using core-js (e.g. by using Angular) you can just import the according polyfill:

   import 'core-js/es7/object';
Answer

You can use a polyfill:

const valuesPolyfill = function values (object) {
  return Object.keys(object).map(key => object[key]);
};

const values = Object.values || valuesPolyfill;

console.log(values({ a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }));

Answer

For people using UnderscoreJS, you can get object values by using _.values :

var obj = { foo: 'bar', baz: 42 };
console.log(_.values(obj)); // ['bar', 42]
Answer

I know it is a old topic. I was playing arround and just want to add another implementation. It is simply the map version with the map itself implemented with a reduce :

let obj = { foo: 'bar', baz: 42 };

const valueArray = Object.keys(obj).reduce((acc, key) => {
  acc.push(obj[key]);
  return acc;
}, []);

console.log(valueArray);

It does the job but it has something that bother me. The reducer function uses obj and the obj was not injected in it. We should avoid global variable inside functions and make our functions more testable. So I do prefer this version with a reducer function helper that takes the obj as parameter an return the actual reducer function . It becomes:

let obj = { foo: 'bar', baz: 42 };

// reducer function helper take obj and return the actual reducer function
let reducerFuncHelper= obj => (acc, key) => {
  acc.push(obj[key]);
  return acc;
}
//much better
const valueArray = Object.keys(obj).reduce(reducerFuncHelper(obj), []);
console.log(valueArray);

Answer

As I didn't found an answer for my needs:

var obj = { foo: 'bar', baz: 42 };


console.log(obj[Object.keys(obj)[0]]) // bar

console.log(obj[Object.keys(obj)[1]])  // 42

Using the possibility of objects to adress them per literal.

Answer

You can get array of keys using Object.keys(). This will work in IE also. Object.values() is not required at all to get values since we can use the keys obtained from Object.keys() to get values as below:

var obj = { foo: 'bar', baz: 42 };
var keyArray = Object.keys(obj);
for(var i = 0; i < keyArray.length; i++)
    console.log(obj[keyArray[i]]); 
Answer

You can get array of keys with Object.keys() and then use map() to get values.

var obj = { foo: 'bar', baz: 42 };
var values = Object.keys(obj).map(function(e) {
  return obj[e]
})

console.log(values)

With ES6 you can write this in one line using arrow-functions.

var values = Object.keys(obj).map(e => obj[e])
Answer

var x = {Name: 'John', Age: 30, City: 'Bangalore'};
 
Object.prototype.values = function(obj) {
                                var res = [];
    for (var i in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(i)) {
            res.push(obj[i]);
        }
    }
    return res;
};
 
document.getElementById("tag").innerHTML = Object.values(x)
<p id="tag"></p>

Answer

Best way is to replace it with the values method of ramda:

import * as R from 'ramda';

const obj = { foo: 'bar', test: 10 };

console.log(R.values(obj)) // ['bar', 10]

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